Finally, the frost heaves are in bloom

By Ray Carbone

There’s a tender coldness to the air today.

It’s spring in New Hampshire – the New Hampshire that’s on calendars, not the one that’s got lighthouses or the one that looks likes the suburbs of Boston. New Hampshire’s spring has some wonderfully charming days like this one.

The only thing that it compares to it is in the fall, when the leaves stand posed at the end of branches showing off their red and gold colors, as they prepare to launch out into the cool blue sky and onto the green-brown ground.

These spring days are pregnant with warmth.

Not real warmth…

There’s a poignancy to these days too, a real sense that they’re here only to leave, like your first love or seeing your favorite car just as it disappears around a corner. These spring days are pregnant with warmth. Not real warmth yet – that’s still ten or fifteen more degrees away before we’re casting off our coats and sweaters. But, a warmth still the same, something that bespeaks of light ahead.

In this New Hampshire, that hint is mostly seen in the heavy water. Somewhere, deep down, below that drift of snow leaning against the barn, beneath the plowed piles clinging to the sides of your driveway, is the water, melting down as the depth of the snow sinks.

It’s known as mud season here, starting sometime in March and heading into April, May, even June some years. It’s messy and annoying, but it’s also a promise.

Spring is here. Summer is coming.

© 2019, Carbone Productions, LLC

 

 

 

 

 

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The first ski trains in New England were launched in Warner, N.H.

By Ray Carbone

WARNER – Looking at this small picturesque New England town today, it’s hard to imagine the significant role it once played in the development of the region’s winter tourism industry.

But it was about 85 years ago when a local businessman made the biggest deal of his life, drawing more than 200 people to town in America’s first “ski train.”

‘They left Boston’s North Station and arrived in a town with a little over 1,000 people… Word spread, and Warner was soon known as the winter sports capital of central New Hampshire.’

Rebecca Courser, the executive director of the Warner Historical Society, talked about the event, and the subsequent impact of impact on the town, as a special “Snow Train Dinner & Talk” in the town hall recently. The society’s fundraising event drew more than 200 people.

Buck Whitford introduced skiing to the town in 1909, Courser explained. He’d picked it up when visiting family members in Minnesota, and initiated friends and neighbors into the sport. It wasn’t long before locals in Warner – and in other northeastern communities – were making their own wooden skis, swooping down their hills and mountains.

But it was John “Happy Jack” Chandler who initiated the ski trains, according to Courser. In the early 1930s, Chandler took a trip to Boston. He visited several large businesses where he promoted Warner as a great place for a wintertime company trip. Some of the organizations sent representatives to the town and, after seeing the local hotels, restaurants and skiing facilities, some – including the John Hancock Insurance company – decided to take Chandler up on his invitation.

“They left Boston’s North Station and arrived in a town with a little over 1,000 citizens,” Courser said of the early ski trains. “The Boston folks grew to have a great appreciation for Warner as a winter playground. Word spread, and Warner was soon known as the winter sports capital of central New Hampshire.”

Of course the operations were relatively primitive. With no snowmaking equipment, business was completely dependent on natural snowfall. So when one winter brought a dearth of good cover, Armdam Doucette, the town barber, challenged the other men in town to join him in a pledge, “not to shave until we get some skiable snow,” Courser said.

In 1950, the Boston-Warner ski train brought 1,200 people to town, making the largest corporate outing America had ever seen.

Almost 30 men participated and, although there’s no proof that it impacted any wintry precipitation, it did bring the town some unexpected publicity. “Permanent five o’clock shadow hovers over Warner,” was a headline seen as far away as California, Courser said. And when the snow finally arrived after Christmas, the ski train people returned.

When the country entered the prosperous post-World War II years, things really took off. At that time, there were 14 inns and hotels operating in Warner during the winter months.

One weekend, approximately 900 Hancock employees got off the ski trains, virtually doubling the town’s population. In 1950, the Boston-Warner ski train brought 1,200 people to town, making the trip the largest corporate outing America had ever seen.

But by 1956, poor skiing conditions and increased competition from places like the state-owned Sunapee resort began the decline of the local tourism industry.

“Many of the inns shut down abruptly,” Courser noted.

War.SkiRR-statn
Main Depot receiving snow train visitors. Dr. Put’s cadillac, Henry Wachsmuth Buick, James Hardy truck. 1953

 

The local ski operations were eventually turned over to the schools. When construction of Interstate 89 divided the primary ski area, the operations were later moved to the Mink Hills area. By the 1980s, the ski businesses were gone.

But the ski trains had a major economic impact on the town for more than 25 years. It brought new people to Warner, some who returned during the summer, and some eventually settling here. And the winter population hike forced local residents, businesses and civic organizations to work cooperatively, Courser concluded.

This story first appeared in the InterTown Record weekly newspaper, published in Sutton, New Hampshire, Tuesday, February 19, 2019. All images are courtesy of the Warner (N.H.) Historical Society.

 

Wilmot explosion, house fire leads to a jail term, possible trial in January

PHOTO: Adam Dalton, left, and Shane Fourtier, both of Wilmot, were charged for their alleged role in an explosion that lead to a fire that destroyed a local home.

Dalton: Wilmot house fire/explosion trial pushed back

By Ray Carbone

WILMOT – The trial of Adam Dalton, a 26-year-old local man charged with instigating a burglary that resulted in an explosion and fire in a home on Route 4A in 2017, is being delayed.

Dalton was scheduled to go on trial on Tuesday, Dec. 18, but according to papers filed with the Merrimack Country Superior Court recently, the court action has been pushed back. Court officials did not have a specific date the trial will begin last week, but Judge Richard B. McNamara has scheduled a dispositional hearing related to Dalton’s case for that same day, Dec. 18. (The dispositional hearing, which could indicate whether the case is headed towards a trial or some kind of plea agreement, has been rescheduled for Jan. 23.)

Fortier agreed to a plea agreement, admitting to a felony charge of burglary, for 12 months in the county jail with three months suspended for good behavior.

Dalton and Shane Fortier, 30, another Wilmot resident, were charged with illegally entering the summer cottage at 543 Route 4A on the morning of May 1 with plans to steal its copper piping. Authorities say that as part of the theft, the local pair cut the home’s propane lines. When Christopher Beaucher, the son of the home’s owner, stopped by the house, Dalton and Fortier fled without talking telling him about the cut lines. When Beaucher turned on a basement light switch, the spark ignited the propane, producing the explosion and fire. Beaucher suffered serious second-degree burns.

Dalton was indicated by a grand jury on seven charges: burglary, conspiracy to commit burglary, second-degree assault, witness tampering, falsifying physical evidence, solicitation to falsify physical evidence, and practicing mechanical services without a required license.

On Oct. 17, Fortier agreed to a plea agreement, admitting to a felony charge of burglary, for 12 months in the county jail with three months suspended for good behavior. Fortier is also required to pay $4,576 to Beaucher.

It was during that same month (October) that Carley M. Ahern, an assistant attorney with the county prosecutor’s office in Concord, asked the superior court to push back the start of Dalton’s trial to allow staff members to participate in special training scheduled for the same days. As a result, the final pretrial conference for Oct. 26 was delayed, as well the Nov. 13 scheduled meeting to selection of the jury.

This story first appeared in the InterTown Record weekly newspaper, published weekly in Sutton, New Hampshire, on Tuesday, December 11, 2018.

Shane Fourtier: Wilmot explosion, house fire leads to one-year jail term

By Ray Carbone

WILMOT – One of the two men charged with instigating a burglary that resulted in an explosion and fire in a home on Route 4A in 2017 has pled guilty to charges related to the incident.

On Oct. 17, Shane Fortier, 30, of Wilmot entered into a plea agreement with the Merrimack County Attorney’s office, admitting to a felony charge of burglary. His sentence will be 12 months in the county jail, with three months suspended for good behavior and two years’ probation. Fortier will also be ordered to pay $4,576 to Christopher Beaucher, the son of the owner of the residence, who suffered second-degree burns in the conflagration.

The official sentencing was scheduled for early November but Judge John C. Kissinger approved a request to move Fortier’s court appearance back to early December. “(Fortier) was not transported to court today,” according to a document filed in the county courthouse on Nov. 2. “(The) plea (agreement) if fully negotiated and the parties (Fortier and the county attorney) agree to continue the plea and sentencing until a later date.”

Fortier has also pled guilty to two other charges. He admitted to a felony charge of conspiracy to commit burglary for illegally entering the Route 4A residence in order to steal its copper pipes on May 1, 201; he will be sentenced to 1-2 years in prison, but the sentence will be suspended.

When Beaucher turned on a basement light switch, the spark ignited the propane gas causing the explosion and fire. He suffered serious burns…

In a separate case, Fortier admitted to illegally possessing a powerful psychedelic drug called psilocybin; he’s agreed to a 12-month sentence in the county jail and a fine of $434 but both the fine and the incarnation will be suspended.

Fortier and Adam J. Dalton, 26, another Wilmot resident, were charged with illegally entering the summer cottage at 543 Route 4A on the morning of May 1, 2017 with plans to steal its copper piping.

As part of the theft, the two cut the home’s propane lines, but when Christopher Beaucher stopped by the house, he found Dalton and Fortier there. After a short altercation, the pair left without telling Beaucher about the cut lines.

When Beaucher turned on a basement light switch, the spark ignited the propane gas causing the explosion and fire. Beaucher suffered serious burns and was transported to the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon.

Firefighters from New London, Sutton, Springfield, Andover and Danbury assisted the Wilmot Fire Department but the cottage was eventually declared a total loss.

In December 2017, J. William Degnan, the state fire marshal, joined Sean Brunel, Wilmot’s fire chief and David Zuger, the town’s police chief, in announcing the arrests of Fortier and Dalton. (The trio also credited the New London, Danbury and Bradford police departments for help with their investigation.)

While Fortier has already begun serving his sentence, Dalton is free on $10,000 cash bail. He’s been indicted for burglary, conspiracy to commit burglary, second-degree assault, witness tampering, falsifying physical evidence, solicitation to falsify physical evidence, and practicing mechanical services without a required license.

This story first appeared in the InterTown Record weekly newspaper, published in Sutton, New Hampshire on Tuesday, Nov. 13.

 

NH Fish and Game Dept. wants to hold onto Wild Goose site on Lake Sunapee

By Ray Carbone

CONCORD – At a public meeting last week, Glenn Normandeau, the executive director of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, said that his office is looking at ways to leverage the state-owned Wild Goose property in Newbury in order to develop a public boat launch site on Lake Sunapee – even if Wild Goose is not where the facility is located.

Fish and game still prefers building its required launch on the Wild Goose land. However the agency is considering alternatives, including selling the land and purchasing another waterfront lot, or entering into an agreement with one or more local towns that would allow the pubic to use their municipally-owned launch sites.

Normandeau made his remarks to other members of the state’s 12-member Council on Resources and Development (CORD), which is part of the state’s office of strategic initiatives, at a meeting in the state’s department of education building on Thursday, Nov. 8. CORD is charged with facilitating interagency communications and cooperation relating to environmental, natural resources and growth management issues.

‘We cannot commit to any specific use or investments at this time, especially considering that we have tens of millions of deferred maintenance across the (state’s) parks system.’

– Sarah L. Stewart, commissioner of NH dept. of natural & cultural resources

At the meeting, Normandeau outlined the 20-years-plus history of his department’s efforts to provide a required public access facility for Lake Sunapee boaters, including two cases decided by the NH Supreme Court and numerous hearings before boards associated with the state’s department of environmental services.

“This (Wild Goose) project has been to CORD twice in the past, and twice CORD voted to support putting our boat ramp sites there,” the director said. “The property was purchased for this purpose, given to this agency for this purpose. And I have directions from both our commission, in a 11-0 vote, and the public water access advisory board, in a 9-1 vote, to try to retain control of the property.”

Fish and game’s management of the Wild Goose site is in now question after the Lake Sunapee Boat Access Development Commission, appointed by Gov. Chris Sununu, issued a report recommending that the Newbury land be abandoned as a possible launch site and alternative uses for the land be considered. (One suggestion is that it be made into a state park controlled by the state’s department of natural and cultural resources.)

“We wish to retain the property, at the very least, pending an alternative site being found,” Normandeau told his fellow CORE members. “It would be unprecedented to removed a property from one agency that wants to retain it and give it to another. And, I would not consider that a great precedent… We have a strong feeling that it should not be transferred to another agency.”

Instead, the director said that the land could provide needed financial resources.

“We might consider going to the legislature to see if we can sell the property at fair market value and use the money as a start to getting the money we’d need,” to purchase an alternative piece of waterfront land and/or to cover cost related to developing a new launch facility, Normandeau explained.

(Typically, state-owned land deemed surplus by one department is transferred to another. The director said the state officially estimates that the 3.1-acre Wild Goose property would be worth $1.2-million on the open market.)

Normandeau also noted that because Wild Goose is known to be in the state’s public access land inventory, it serves to encourage local towns to consider allowing the public to use their town-operated launch sites. “It would behoove us to keep that property in the access program,” he said.

Earlier in the meeting, Sarah L. Stewart, the commissioner of the department of natural and cultural resources, said that while her agency had never requested management of the Wild Goose land, it would be obligated by statute to accept it if it were to be offered.

“It is important for me to include in our comments that developing, maintaining, managing and staffing property takes resources,” Stewart added. “We cannot commit to any specific use or investments at this time, especially considering that we have tens of millions of deferred maintenance across the parks system.”

CORD’s next meeting is tentatively scheduled for January 10. At that time, the committee is expected to review what could be next step regarding the Wild Goose land.

This story originally appeared  in the InterTown Record weekly newspaper, published in Sutton, New Hampshire, on Tuesday, November 13, 2018.

 

Lawsuit against Bradford, employees could take some time

PHOTO: The former Candlelight Inn in Bradford village has reopened as the Bradford Village Inn, but it cannot operate legally as a lodging establishment until a lawsuit filed by the owner against the town is resolved. (Ray Carbone/photo)

By Ray Carbone

BRADFORD – A local innkeeper’s lawsuit against the town and two local officials may not be resolved for more than a year, according to documents filed in the U.S. District Court in Concord.

In March, Joseph Torro, the owner of the historic Bradford Country Inn on Greenhouse Lane, sued the Town of Bradford, as well as Mark Goldberg, chief of the fire-rescue department, and Marilyn Gordon, the town treasurer, for allegedly conspiring against his efforts to re-open the 121-year-old lodging facility after he purchased in August 2014. Court papers filed in July indicate that a jury trial would likely last about three or four days’ but a tentative start date is still about one year away, on August 20, 1019.

In separate documents, both (employees) deny all charges of illegal or improper behavior.

Earlier this month, Judge Andrea K. Johnstone, who is presiding over the case, asked the two sides to consider mediation to resolve their dispute. “By April 1, 2019, the parties shall inform the court whether they intend to mediate,” she wrote.

Rick Lehmann, the attorney representing Torro, said he’s preparing for a trial by jury but he’s open to discussions with lawyers representing the other sides. “If they want to talk, we’ll talk,” he said.

Torro claims that Goldberg and Gordon, who were romantically involved, used their political influence to create unfair roadblocks to operating the lodging business, including conspiring with the selectmen to withhold property tax abatements and trying to unfairly enforce fire safety/safety codes. He’s asking for $2 million in monetary damages as well as an indeterminate amount of punitive damages.

In court paperwork filed earlier this summer, the attorneys representing the town and the two employees disputed the innkeeper’s claims.

In separate documents, both Goldberg and Gordon deny all charges of illegal or improper behavior.

“(Goldberg) denies that he attempted to destroy (Torro’s) business prospect,” the fire chief’s document reads. “(Goldberg) notes that he never ran the Candlelight Inn (the former name of the property),” as charged by the current property owner.

In her court response, Gordon refutes Torro’s claim that she had to sell the Candlelight Inn because she was not a successful business owner, and that she and Goldberg wanted Torro to also fail in the hopes of her eventually regaining the property.

In the town’s court paperwork, officials deny that their employees treated Torro differently than other property owners regarding his request for a fire permit and tax abatements. “The abatement application could not be granted for the 2014 tax year because the application was filed too late,” the town attorneys claim. “An abatement could not be granted (for the 2015 tax year) because the application was submitted too early.”

The town’s legal response also questions Torro’s arguments regarding the reasons for any alleged unfair treatment by Goldberg and Gordon. “While the town notes that it lacks information regarding the alleged subjective motivation of Goldberg and Gordon describe, it disputes the characterization of their actions as well was (Torro’s) allegation that there was a conspiracy, discrimination and/or abuse of government power and influence.”

This story first ran in the InterTown Record weekly newspaper, published in Sutton, New Hampshire, on August 28, 2018.

Nothing new on this New Hampshire lake – every 5 years

By Ray Carbone

SUTTON – Sometime next month, Bruce Ellsworth will head out to the ancient dam at the southern end of Blaisdell Lake and remove a few boards to allow the water to rush through a little more rapidly. Then in early December, he’ll go back and reinstall the boards, significantly dropping the flow of water.

It’s a task that Ellsworth has been doing for about 40 years now. Every five years, the dam is opened up to allow the 153-acre lake level to drop about 4½-feet. That allows the 80-plus property owners on the lake the opportunity to do any deck or other lakefront work they need.

But before that happens, state regulations require a public hearing before the board of selectmen. That hearing was held last month, and no one who was not required to be there attended, Ellsworth reported.

He wasn’t surprised.

“I’ve been doing this for more than 40 years and never had anyone shown up,” he said.

Blaisdell Lake in South Sutton is what Ellsworth calls a “family lake.”

‘My great, great-grandfather had a place here in 1900. Before that, I don’t know.’

Bruce Ellswoth, Sutton resident

“It’s a very quiet lake,” he explained. “There are family activities but we’re not a society-driven (community)… There are many, many families that have been here for generations. It’s not unusual for one generations of families to return here and take over (the property) for the previous one.”

Ellsworth has never had to do that because his family has been on Blaisdell for more than 100 years, he said. “My folks built a camp here in 1936 but I was born here in 1938,” he said. “And my great, great-grandfather had a place here in 1900. Before that, I don’t know.”

The 80-year-old resident also doesn’t know when the dam was built. “It’s a stone dam with a concrete face,” he explained. “I know it goes back to the 1800s. Its purpose at one time was to maintain a good level, just like now.

“But Blaisdell Lake was only about half the size it is today. The southern part was called Great Pond, and it was a naturally formed lake, he added. “Than, probably, with the dam it grew to its current size. But, I don’t know for sure.”

Back in 1950, the Blaisdell Lake Property Owners Association, now called the Blaisdell Lake Protective Association, was formed. “And that was the result of the fact that the dam was in disrepair and it was causing some pretty significant changes in the elevation of the lake, depending on the weather,” Ellsworth said. “So, one of our bylaws was to maintain the dam because it was a concern of all the residents to maintain a stable level.”

The drawdown also allows the association to do needed maintenance on the dam, he noted. “We’ve found that pressure washing every five years and adding a protective coating is a good preventative maintenance,” he said. “It costs about $7,000. And it’s the most expensive item we have in our budget.”

Today, state laws require that the association work with the NH Department of Environmental Services to insure that the dam’s maintenance and lake operating plans are suitable to maintain Blaisdell’s ecological health. And as part of that responsibility, there is a public hearing before the drawdown every five years.

So, it’s held, even if no one shows up.

This story first appeared in the InterTown Record weekly newspaper, published in Sutton, New Hampshire, on Tuesday, August 7, 2018.

 

 

Vail to take over New Hampshire resort

By Ray Carbone

NEWBURY, N.H. – The public meeting held at the Sunapee Lodge on the Mount Sunapee Resort property last week was much less contentious than a similar one held in the same building last year.

At the earlier gathering, more than 100 people came to the state’s Department of National and Cultural Resources (DNCR) meeting to voice their opposition to the transfer of the resort’s recreational lease to Och-Ziff Real Estate. The multi-national alternative asset management firm had recently paid the federal government $413 million in fines, and supporters of the local resort were concerned that the organization would not manage the local property appropriately.

Things were much different last Wednesday, July 25, when an even larger crowd came together to voice their support to Sarah Stuart, the DNCR’s commissioner, for a proposal to turn Mount Sunapee’s lease and operating agreements over to Vail Resorts, operators of the famous Vail Mountain Resort in Colorado.

‘Candidly, Vail is a dream partner.’

Hessler Gates, Sunapee resident

The deal is part of an $82 million sales agreement that will also add Vermont’s Okemo Mountain resort and the Crested Butte Mountain Resort in Colorado to the Vail, Colorado company. (Vail Resorts also owns/manages Stowe in Vermont; Beaver Creek, Breckenridge and Keystone in Colorado; Park City in Utah; Heavenly, Northstar and Kirkwood in the Lake Tahoe area; Wilmot in Wisconsin; After Alps in Minnesota; Mt. Brighton in Michigan; Whistler Blackcomb in British Columbia; and Perisher in Australia.)

Tim and Diane Mueller, owners of the companies that have managed the local resort since 1998, told the crowd that if they could have chosen an organization to take over their enterprises, it would be the Vail group.

“Vail is clearly the leading ski operating company in the country, if not the world,” Tim Muerller said. “I’m glad we’re turning it over to them.”

The audience gave the Muellers an appreciative round of applause.

Speaking for the new managers, Pat Campbell, president of Vail Resorts’ mountain division, said her company is excited about its first business foray into New Hampshire and that it remains “incredibly passionate” about creating memorable resort experiences for visitors.

In addition, the company’s Epic Pass, which allows for unlimited skiing at all of its 14 resorts, will be available at Sunapee. (Vail owns and/or operates resorts throughout North America and Australia.)

Addressing concerns that Vail would push for more development at and around the Sunapee resort, Campbell said that her company has been divesting itself of properties that are primarily real estate and that it has no plans to move forward with either the West Bowl Expansion or any other development project in the area.

“Candidly, Vail is a dream partner,” Hessler Gates of Sunapee said in the public commentary portion of the meeting. “For the decision-makers, this should be an easy decision and I urge you to do it promptly.”

The majority of the speakers were in agreement with Gates, urging Commissioner Stuart and others involved in the transfer to approve it as quickly as possible.

Campbell said she’s hoping the transfer will be completed by Labor Day.

But some did express concerns.

A member of the New Hampshire Sierra Club repeated an earlier call for an independent audit of the resort’s finances, and encouraged the Vail team to maintain the four non-skiing trails on Mount Sunapee.

Another speaker asked how the Vail proposal had come forward so quickly and whether there is an appeal process if the state turns down its proposal.

Will Abbott of the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests said Vail Resorts could prove its intent to stay focused on recreation, rather than development, by permanently conserving 600 acres of land located in Goshen. The idea was heartily applauded by the audience.

Holly Flanders, a two-time Olympic and three-time World Cup alpine racer who grew up skiing and racing at Sunapee, said that from her current home in Park City, Utah, she’s become familiar with how the Vail company operates.

“Vail is a great ski operator, they invest in improvements,” she told the crowd.

“I tell you want I’ve seen,” she added. “Many local businesses are making more money. Property values are going up. The ski area is more crowded, so the roads are more crowded. And everything is more expensive – the hotels and restaurants.”

 

Photo: Breath -taking view of Lake Sunapee from the Mount Sunapee Resort, by Garrett Evans. Courtesy of Vail Resorts.

This story first appeared in the InterTown Record, a weekly newspaper published in Sutton, New Hampshire, on Tuesday, July 31, 2018.

Plans to abandon Wild Goose move ahead

By Ray Carbone

CONCORD – State officials met with members of the public last week to hear their concerns about the recommendations of the Lake Sunapee Boat Access Development Commission announced earlier this year.

The commission’s final report suggests that the state abandon its long-delayed plan to create a state-owned and operated deep-water lake access facility at the former Wild Goose campground in Newbury, and look for alternative sites. It also recommends that parking at the Lake Sunapee State Beach be increased to allow for more use of the smaller, shallower launch there.

‘The issue is not public access. The issue is (the need for) increased parking.’

– June Fichter of the Lake Sunapee Protective Association

Last week’s hearing, held in Department of Revenue Administration building on Pleasant Street, was held before the Council on Resources and Development (CORD, part of the planning division of the state’s Office of Strategic Initiatives). CORD consists of 12 department heads who are charged with facilitating interagency communications and cooperation relating to environmental, natural resources and growth management issues. The commission’s report involves the fish and game department, which currently has jurisdiction over Wild Goose land, as well as the state’s division of parks that would take over the property and develop it for other recreational purposes.

About 20 people spoke to the council, and the arguments were familiar.

Opponents of the commission’s recommendations said that Wild Goose is the only viable site for a deep-water boat launch on the lake. Supporters point to serious traffic problems that would develop in Newbury.

June Fichter, the executive director of the Lake Sunapee Protective Association, said her organization supports the commission’s recommendations because it puts the focus in the right place. “The issue is not public access,” she said, adding that boat traffic on Sunapee has increased about 270-percent over the last 16 years. “The issue is (the need for) increased parking.”

Gene Porter, a member of the state’s public water access advisory board and a representative of the state motorized boating population, said the commission’s report was “weakly reasoned.”

“These boaters, fishermen and water skiers want first-class access to Sunapee just as they have on Winnipesaukee and Squam,” he said.

CORD will hold its next meeting on September 13 when it will begins considering whether or not to accept the access commission’s recommendations.

This story first appeared in the InterTown Record weekly newspaper, published in North Sutton, New Hampshire, on Tuesday, July 17, 2018.

 

 

 

Lake Sunapee access will be focus of hearing in Concord this week

By Ray Carbone

CONCORD – The NH Office of Strategic Initiatives’ (OSI) Council on Resources and Development (CORD; part of OSI’s energy planning division) is scheduled to hold a public hearing this Thursday addressing the long-debated issue of public access to Lake Sunapee.

The CORD agenda lists “public comment” as its first item.

The council will be discussing the recent report of the Lake Sunapee Public Boat Access Development Commission issued in the spring. The 15-member commission, which was appointed by Gov. Chris Sununu, recommended that the state abandon its original plans to build a mandated deep-water state-owned and managed public boat launch at the former Wild Goose campground area in Newbury. The report suggests that the 3-acre property be considered for other recreational uses, but made no specific recommendation about an alternative site for the boat launch.

CORD, which consists of representatives from 12 state agencies, was formed to provide a forum for interagency cooperation regarding environmental, natural resources and growth management issues and policies. The group is required to adhere to the state’s Smart Growth Policy, outlined in the 2016 Smart Growth Report.

Thursday’s hearing will be the first since the commission wrapped up its work several months ago. The CORD agenda lists “public comment” as its first item; anyone wishing to present written comment must notify the OSI by emailing Michael A. Klass (michael.klass@osi.nh.gov) OSI’s principal planner, on or before Wednesday, July 11, at 4:30 p.m.

Klass, who joined the state agency in November, has worked as an private attorney dealing with land use, real estate development, property disputes and related litigation.

The meeting will take place in the NH Department of Revenue Administration’s training room at 109 Pleasant Street (Medical & Surgical Building) in Concord, Thursday at 1 p.m. The building is handicap accessible and, for security reasons, everyone attending must sign in and show a valid photo I.D. Driving directions are available at https://www.revenue.nh.gov/contact-us/documents/campus-map.pdf

More information about the hearing is available at https://www.nh.gov/osi/planning/programs/cord/index.htm, and questions can be addressed to Klass at 271-6651 or Micheel.klass@ois.nh.gov

This story first appeared in the InterTown Record weekly newspaper, published in Sutton, New Hampshire on Tuesday, July 10, 2018.

 

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